While 2020 may have been the of the worst years of all years for anyone, one of the big positives for the year is that Americans paid down their collective credit card debt by a record $82.9 billion worth of debt. It just so happens that one of the cities in America that seems to be doing well when it comes to credit card debt is Cheyenne, WY.

WalletHub recently researched which cities had the biggest paydown in credit card debt, which also included which cities had the most and least sustainable debts based on info provided by TransUnion and Federal Reserve.

On a list of more than 180 of the biggest cities in the U.S., Cheyenne, WY was ranked 18th in terms of having the biggest pay downs of their credit card debt over the past year. Basically, that means the average credit card debt decreased by about $460 for Cheyenne during the past year. The average credit card debt for the city was about $10,961. That's a pretty substantial reduction in debt from any standpoint. And that also says a lot given the fact that we're talking about the number of big cities in the U.S. that were on the list.

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The biggest average decrease in debt came from Oxnard, CA at roughly $1,270 while some cities on the list had quite the increase, such as Burlington, VT with a $3,020 increase.

So Cheyenne, well done! Way to pay down that credit card debt which certainly seems like it can be a mountain at times. Better days are ahead and we're certainly making our way there based on what happened in the worst year of all worst years.

The Most Expensive Neighborhoods in Cheyenne

Cheyenne, like any city, is made up of many different neighborhoods. While none of them are as famous as SoHo in New York City or Five Points in Denver, Wyoming's capital city has about 20 neighborhoods that its nearly 65 thousand residents live in.

Neighborhood Scout scoured the information on the Chey-town neighborhoods that make up the 32.37 square miles of the city to find where the most expensive places are to live. We're talking about real estate here, not the price of milk or anything. That kind of stuff is pretty uniform across the city.