This week's winter storm was one for the record books, with Cheyenne setting a new daily snowfall record on Wednesday.

The National Weather Service in Cheyenne tallied 4.1 inches of snow, barely breaking the old record of 4.0 inches set way back in 1958.

"Combined with the snow that fell Tuesday evening, we had a storm total of 6.2 inches," the NWS said.

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Heavy snow was also reported east of Cheyenne along Interstate 80, with Burns picking up 9.7 inches, Kimball 8.5 inches, and Sidney 8.0 inches.

US National Weather Service Cheyenne Wyoming via Facebook
US National Weather Service Cheyenne Wyoming via Facebook
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Estimated Storm Total Snow Graphic!
Here are the observed snowfall amounts over the past 36 hours. Here in at our office in Cheyenne, we broke our daily record yesterday for snowfall with 4.1 inches. Combined with the snow that fell Tuesday evening, we had a storm total of 6.2 inches. The big winners were just east of Cheyenne, where we had several reports of 8-10 inches between Burns and Sidney.

Pictures From Wyoming Snowpocalypse 2021

After two days and 30-odd inches of sow, southeast Wyoming was left buried. An in the grand tradition of every generation since the invention of the camera, we took pictures of the snow.

The Blizzard of March 2021 covered up our driveways, fences, and in some cases porches. It trapped up in our homes and canceled our plans.

Here's a quick look around the Cheyenne area from Sunday (March 14) and Monday (March 15).

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