Do you know anyone who helped when the World Trade Center Towers fell?

Firefighters from the Poudre Fire Authority in Ft. Collins assisted in the recovery efforts after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and they are being honored with a steel beam from the World Trade Center Towers.

A five-foot long, 3,000 pound beam from the World Trade Center Towers in New York City will be presented to firefighters at the Poudre Fire Authority in Ft. Collins on Saturday, October 24. The beam is one of the final artifacts being given to firefighting crews across the country who traveled to New York to help in the days and weeks following the tragedy that killed more than 3,000 people, including 343 firefighters.

The procession carrying the beam will depart from Lincoln, Nebraska at 8 a.m. on Saturday, October 24, and will travel west on Interstate 80 to Cheyenne where it will turn south on to Interstate 25 to continue on to Ft. Collins. You can follow it's progress with a website updated every half hour of the journey.

Firefighters from Cheyenne Fire and Rescue, LCFD1 and 2, FE Warren, Crash Fire from the Guard and the Brigade of Holly Frontier will honor the procession on the overpasses at College Drive and High Plains Road where they cross over I-25. Some lanes will be closed to accommodate the fire trucks, firefighters and their flag arch.

The public is invited to view the World Trade Center beam procession as it passes through Cheyenne. Derek Pollnow with the Cheyenne Fire Department reminds everyone to exercise extreme caution while they're viewing and be sure they're not creating any traffic hazards. The Poudre Fire Authority website has photos from the journey.

Since the steel beam left New York City on October 21, more than 100 fire departments and other organizations have helped with the procession as a tribute to fire and rescue personnel lost in the 9/11 tragedy. Lieutenant Rod Olson of Cheyenne Fire & Rescue says 'honoring this artifact, that forever changed fire service and emergency responses, is the least that we can do to remember those who gave all on 9/11, not to forget those who were killed in the line of duty before and after.