Once again, our friends at the Farmers’ Almanac have worked whatever magic they do to look into our weather future. For summer 2021 they are predicting that Wyoming may be in for an especially hot and stormy season.

“There will be a greater-than-average frequency of thunderstorms for a large portion of the country,” Almanac editor, Peter Geiger, Philom said in a statement. “Many of these storms could prove to be quite strong, particularly over the eastern third of the nation.”

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Graphic by Farmers’ Almanac

This summer is looking to be about beating the heat The Almanac says that through most of the United States, including here in Wyoming, we'll be feeling "searing temperatures."

In addition, they predict the peak of this summer's heal will come in late August and early September. So, not only a hot summer but a long one.

If the hot weather isn't enough summer fun for you, the weather wizards at the Farmers' Almanac say that we can also look forward to an especially stormy summer too.

“The only area that won’t see an above-average number of rainstorms this summer is the  Southwest,” Sandi Duncan, Philom., Farmers' Almanac managing editor said, “our long-range forecast is predicting an exceptionally parched summer season for California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and New Mexico.”

Thunderstorm activity could be "greater-than-average" according to the Almanac's predictions. This includes the possibility of increased tornado activity in June and July.

"Portions of the Central and Southern Rockies and Great Plains could also experience higher-than-normal thunderstorm activity." - Farmers' Almanac

Summer in Wyoming will start, officially, on Father's Day in 2021, June 20. But, of course, this is Wyoming so I wouldn't be surprised if we woke up to a dusting of snow on the first day of summer. After all, since 1883, it has snowed in Cheyenne at least 16 times during the month of June.

MORE: Fun Fact: Cheyenne Has Had 16 Snowstorms In The Month Of June

Before you go cutting off all your pants in preparation for the summer broil, remember that nothing is certain in weather when looking this far out. The Farmers’ Almanac predictions are based on history, weather patterns, climatic data, and their own formulas.

 

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